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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Wednesday, 30 October 2013

The London Wall

The first wall was built by the Romans around 200AD. It was about 2 miles long and incorporated a fort. In the 4th cent it was strengthened with towers. The Roman wall formed the foundation of the City wall. It was restored as a defensive wall during the medieval and Tudor periods. From the 17th cent, as London rapidly expanded, a defensive wall was no longer needed. Much of it was demolished in the 18th and 19th cent. However during the 20th cent excavations have revealed several sections.



This section is at Cooper's Row in the courtyard of the Grange Hotel. The wall is 10.6m high in this section. During the medieval times it was heightened by 6.2m as well as the ditch at the side of the wall being widened.








  Walking through the doorway gives you some idea how thick the walls were. 




You can see the V shape here below the opening which is where a double staircase led to the sentry walks. The archeologists think that the sentries would have walked along wooden platforms secured by timber from the holes which you can see. This is the only part of the excavated walls which has this arrangement. It is thought that there were extra defences here as it is so close to the Tower of London.


This is the Archer's loophole which provided protection for the archer as he aimed his arrows through the hole.



Here you can see the red tiles and ragstone of  the roman part of the wall which is about 4m high.




 

12 comments:

  1. That's wonderful this old wall has been preserved for all too see.

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  2. There you go, a little bit more history on London I did not know about

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  3. thanks for increasing my knowledge of London! the wall is incredible.

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  4. Those Romans were brilliant to engineer something that is still upright after all these years! I walked most of Hadrians Wall in the north of England in the early '80s. There are fascinating Roman ruins to view along the way. How wonderful that this piece has been saved!

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  5. As when we visited Vindolanda, it is hard to believe something made by humans can be so old.

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  6. Those marvelous stone walls are captivating! Wish we could come back and see so many of the things you point out that we missed.

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  7. How wonderful that it has been found and restored for history. It must be amazing to be so close to such and era.

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  8. I wonder where these walls are ? The Romans really were everywhere, now in France they persecuted me too !

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  9. I'm thinking it must have taken a very long time to build a wall that thick!

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  10. Every time you post one of these interesting historical places to visit, I just know that there a loads of people that would just love to visit them too. Including me :).

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  11. How exciting that so many people can have the experience of walking through the London. I remember seeing small bits of it in parts of the city but nothing like this, What a fascinating post. genie

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  12. What a fascinating post! Tremendous to see the modern day architects built around/over this piece of history - and what a contrast !! Thanks for sharing. (I'm currently planning a trip to the UK and Europe next year and am excited about exploring the glorious architecture of yesteryear that both have to offer - thanks for the foretaste!) Wishing you a happy weekend

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