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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Sunday, 20 October 2013

Moore/Rodin exhibition

20 miles outside London is the Henry Moore Foundation where Moore lived for many years. His house is set within 50 acres of land with his sculptures on display in the open air where they belong. Sculptures need to be touched and seen from all angles. Hope you enjoy them as much as I did.


Family group (1948-49)


 



Reclining figure - bunched (1969)





Three piece sculpture vertebrae (1968)







Upright motive No.9 (1979)


Sheep piece (1971-72)







Large reclining figure (1984)












Three piece reclining figure draped (1975)


Large upright internal/external form(1981-82)







The arch (1969)







Goslar Warrior (1973-74)


Double Oval (1966)



Reclining figure: Angles (1979)


















For the first time Rodin's sculptures were exhibited alongside Moore's. To see the works of two of our greatest modern sculptors was a feast for the eyes. A number of works were on loan from the Musee Rodin, Paris which is one of my favourite Parisien museums.

Jean d'Aire Monumental Nude

Monument to the Burghers of Calais 1889









Adam (1881)






Eve (1881)



Cybele (1905)



Linking with Our World Tuesday Graphic
Hope you enjoyed walking through the sculpture park with me.

24 comments:

  1. I did indeed enjoy our stroll through the sculptures, although I didn't get to touch any, I'm sure you did that for me. I wonder if that sheep was enjoying the sculpture, too. :-)

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  2. Aren't they just wonderful. I like Family group. Large upright internal/external form looks absolutely huge. Jean d'Aire Monumental Nude reminds me of Putin.

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  3. I was never a fan of Moore but his sculptures work well outside, glad you enjoyed the day

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  4. I would love to go there, didn't know about the foundation until you mentioned it. The large reclining figure from 1984 we had here too but in white! I could hardly believe he had made it, it was do different from all his other works in grey or brown stone. So it is made in two different materials. The photo with the sheep is so funny. He has made so many sculptures, it is unbelievable!

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  5. Wonderful to see both fabulous sculptors works together ... indeed they definitely belong outdoors and need to be touchable. (Your pictures are great... I almost feel as if I could!)

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  6. I like the figure lazing in the grass with clouds as a backdrop. I imagine this sculpture looks quite different from other angles. Not sure why but a twisted pretzel came to mind viewing some of these sculptures!

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  7. Moore was so talented! I love his work. It's pure magic, at least to my senses.

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  8. What a fabulous treat for the eyes of those of us who love sculpture. This is an amazing post and one to which I will have to return. So many unbelievable pieces. Thanks so much for sharing them with us. genie

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  9. I do agree with Genie, this is a terrific treat indeed! Amazing sculptures and wonderful captures as well!! A very talented man indeed!! Thanks so much for sharing!!

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  10. I love them all and do want to touch and feel and look from all angles. But the sheep takes the cake! I hope she enjoyed her view of the sculptures as much as you!

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  11. Thanks for a wonderful photographic tour ~ a feast for the eyes ~ love goat in the photos ~ carol ~
    http://www.acreativeharbor.com

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  12. Great sculptures. I'm showing my lack of culture by saying I wasn't familiar with either of these people.

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  13. What a wonderful exhibit! Moore's sculptures look so fluid and soft -- very graceful!

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  14. I'm a fan of Henry Moore. The Denver Botanic Garden exhibited his work several years ago. I really like his use of negative space. I remember the reclining figure.

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  15. Wonderful sculptures, very artistic.

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  16. Fabulous exhibition and they're in their element outside.

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  17. Amazing creations! What a talented person he is!

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  18. Unique series of the fabulous sculptures!! Great find the place..
    Thanks for sharing..

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  19. I love the one with the real sheep!

    The way things are going I think the coast will look different in 10 years, let alone 20!

    Stewart M - Melbourne

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  20. Both sculptors are great, but so different. Henry Moore is a formidable landscape sculptor. His work is part of the rocky surroundings of the British hills strong and impressive.
    Rodin's work tells stories and expresses emotions, which are easy to see on the faces of the models.
    Thank you for sharing these photos!

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  21. Wonderful post. Sculptures like these are best seen outdoors and like you said you have to look at them from all angles. Great idea to get works for the two artists together.

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  22. Gosh I would love to see this exhibit!

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  23. Ah, absolutely beautiful. I love both Rodin and Henri Moore - A few times in my teens I saw sculptures of these two being displayed in Antwerp! Thanks so much for sharing!

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