Welcome to my blog

This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Sunday, 10 August 2014

London Docklands Museum #12

Inside the London Docklands Museum I was captivated by this model of London Bridge. This first bridge over the River Thames was begun in 1176 and had numerous houses built along its whole length.

In the centre was a  Chapel dedicated to St Thomas a Beckett who was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral in 1170. This picture shows what the chapel would have looked like around 1397 when it was rebuilt. Many pilgrims would stop to worship here on their way to Canterbury.


There was a drawbridge to allow large vessels to travel  upstream












Also in the Museum was a reconstruction of the areas around the river with its dark,narrow passageways and shops like the Ship Chandlers.





















The shipyards and factories all had their own blacksmiths' shops.

I hadn't realised how much opposition there was to the regeneration of the docklands. The idea in 1985 to change the docklands into a new financial area sent shock waves through the community. A Funeral march took place  with a symbolic coffin carried through the streets and posters proclaiming the 'Death of a community'.



Sharing with Our World Tuesday

34 comments:

  1. I really enjoyed that 3-D model of the London Bridge. Although I had seen drawings of it, somehow I got a much more complete picture in my mind of what it was like.
    I think the modern buildings there are beautiful, but I wished they had preserved more of the feel of the old Docklands as well.

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  2. Wow interesting bit of history! That's amazing that houses were built right on the bridge.

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  3. Something like what we refer to as slum clearance. But they were people's homes, I assume. Some should have been kept and adapted.

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  4. Beautiful history and very interesting . Definitely well-organised museum.Thanks.

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  5. Excilent, I must go there, another on my list. Progress has a lot to answer for it does kill off communities, docklands is just one.

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  6. Really, really love how London Bridge was. Super museum.

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  7. What an interesting museum, always so nice to see the history so clear and learn thing you didn't know.

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  8. You have such wonderful places to visit! I'm so glad you share them with me. Your pictures tell a good story, too. :-)

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  9. Great shots from the museum and an interesting narrative.

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  10. A very interesting and informative post. You take a lot of nicely composed photos too.

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  11. Most informative and intriguing post and photos for OWT ~ what a treat for you and us ~

    artmusedog and carol (A Creative Harbor)

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  12. A great tour ... sad when progress kills a community ... I wonder where all those who mourned it's passing went when the transformation was complete. It was quite the 'yuppy' area when we visited and I'm sorry we missed this museum. (There were some plaques that we read along the water alluding to the history of the transformation, but not in this poignant depth).

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  13. How wonderful to have built homes there and to have models made of what they looked like during a time when architecture seemed more enchanted than now.

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  14. What a wonderful tour and post. I like the model of the bridge. Your photos from the museum are great..Have a happy week!

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  15. Another wonderful museum I must visit when I am in London! Thank you for sharing your trip and showing the photos.

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  16. That's a fascinating museum - the replica of the streets must be fun to walk around.

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  17. Oh, a great museum indeed and your captures are terrific!! A great tour! Thanks for sharing! Hope you enjoy a wonderful week!!

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  18. nice museum. thanks for taking photos.

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  19. Very interesting. Thanks for sharing!

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  20. What an interesting and informative blog. The Docklands Museum looks an interesting place to visit. The bus route from Stanstead to Victoria passes alongside the docklands, and also the Tower of London. I would love to see those poppies.

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  21. Wow! what a change from today's Dock-lands. It certainly had character back in the early years.

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  22. It is amazing what ptevious generations managed to construct. The docklands sure have changed ,less character but so much more healthy. Am teading a book at the moment " The secret river" by Kate Grenville. Describing the hardship of poor fellows workong on and living by the Thames in the 18th century. So interesting.

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  23. Very interesting ! Sometimes it's sad when beautiful areas are destroyed ! I remember in beginning of the 90th there were still people who were very furious about the Dockland project ! I don't like this new area either !

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  24. I see lots of great displays in the museum. Thanks for sharing.

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  25. I can remember thinking that the docklands projects had been built are largely derelict land - shows how much I know about the big smoke!

    I kind of assumed that the BIg Blue Cockerel was new - more proof I have no idea!!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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  26. Interesting replicas in the museum.

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  27. I'm a big fan of museums that show how life was way back when. It's one thing to read about (and I do love to read) but another to see it, even though much of it is replicas. I enjoyed this post.

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  28. I will have to put this on my bucket list. very interesting!

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  29. Fascinating. Love that history is preserved. Is the cathedral on a ship?

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  30. Great museum and informative. Oh, knowing how it was is such fun♡♡♡

    Sending Lots of Love and Hugs from Japan, xoxo Miyako*

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  31. A place very close to my heart. My Grandad was one of the people that worked in the archives until his death (he was nearly 98!!). A Docklands man through and through and his knowledge of the area was incredible!

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