Welcome to my blog

This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Sunday, 24 November 2013

The Hardy Tree

Before becoming an author and poet Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) studied architecture under the supervision of a Mr Blomfield. During the 1860s the Midland railway was going to be built over part of St Pancras Churchyard. This meant that the bodies buried there had to be exhumed and moved. The Bishop of London employed Mr Blomfield to carry out the task, who then gave the unenviable job to Mr Hardy.



Hardy would have spent many hours in this churchyard overseeing the removal of the remains and the dismantling of the tombs. The headstones around the base of this ash tree were moved here during that time.






The roots of the tree have now grown between the headstones.



Our World Tuesday Graphic


33 comments:

  1. I didn't know his about Thomas Hardy. It's very fascinating... you have so much history in your posts! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. So he didn't move the headstones with the remains?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow - what an interesting tree and story to go along with it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Co-incidently, I saw this tree somewhere else recently, but I can't remember where. It's a bit strange and I hope the headstone records were kept. Aha, I remember now. http://www.simpleglee.blogspot.com.au/2013/11/day-20-hardy-ash.html

    ReplyDelete
  5. Incredible story and I love how the tree has taken the headstones. What happened to the bodies then and where is the railway in comparison?

    ReplyDelete
  6. So sad that the remains did not get to keep their headstones and now are lost to history as to who they were.

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a sad job he had, must have been depressing to work on the graveyard and to see how all the graves were removed.

    ReplyDelete
  8. How fascinating to know this about Thomas Hardy...would never have thought such a thing.

    ReplyDelete
  9. What a sad, but fascinating post for the day! I can easily imagine how depressing his work must have been!! I would never have thought this about Hardy either!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Interesting how, given enough time, nature claims it's own.

    Hardy must have been a man of many talents.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Fascinating and frightening to think you may not 'rest in peace' after all. Dianne

    ReplyDelete
  12. Interesting post and great shots ~ thanks, carol, xxx

    ReplyDelete
  13. In a way they look quite pretty stacked amid the roots of the ash-tree with autumn leaves sprinkled like confetti. Lovely pics.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Interesting place!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Interesting how the roots have made their way around the tombstones.

    ReplyDelete
  16. A wonderful post... many thanks for sharing this story.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Neat story about Mr Hardy. The tree does not seem to mind the headstones all piles around. I am glad the tree has live on! Have a happy week ahead!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Great photos and a very interesting post. So I am wondering if the church kept a list of all the names of those bodies that were removed and are the names still visible on the head-stones?

    ReplyDelete
  19. Wonderful shots and interesting information.

    ReplyDelete
  20. What a fascinating place. Lovely shots too.

    ReplyDelete
  21. A very interesting story indeed. I suppose even famous poets sometimes have a day job.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Great pictures - the playing card stack of grave stones is wonderful.

    I used to find fossils on the Mendips - probably destroyed an important site collecting them as a kid!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

    ReplyDelete
  23. Interesting. I have seen one such closely packed grave in Prague.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I love stories like this. Thanks for sharing the history and photos

    ReplyDelete
  25. I think that job might have encouraged him to start writing. Great post!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Move a graveyard, what a job ! It looks so strange to see the headstones all squeezed together against this tree. The place could be used for a horror film !

    ReplyDelete
  27. I find the idea of roots between the headstones romantic. Perhaps a strange response :) Very interesting post because it put Thomas Hardy's imaginings as the lives of the people buried in that graveyard became real to him. Loved your photographs as well.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Thanks so much for the comment on my blog..it is strange to see the headstones piled up like that. Interesting posting.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Nice photos! Interesting story narrated beautiful...

    ReplyDelete
  30. thas an odd thing I think. Nice shots and thanks for sharing the story.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Just watched this graveyard and tree feature in BBC 'New Tricks'.

    ReplyDelete

Thank-you for reading my blog. I would love to read your comments.