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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Monday, 4 November 2013

Liverpool Street station

This station is home to the Great Eastern railway. Liverpool St station is the fourth busiest station in the UK. London's Wateloo, Victoria and London Bridge being the other three. Trains from here travel eastwards towards Cambridge and East Anglia.


It was first opened in 1874 but was hit by enemy aircraft in 1917 during the first world war.





During WW2 it was the entry point for the thousands of Jewish children who had escaped  the Nazis. On the platforms were their new foster parents waiting for them.
In Hope Square just outside the station is this statue to the Children of the Kindertransport. The dedication says 'In gratitude to the people of Britain for saving the lives of 10.000 unaccompanied mainly Jewish children who fled from Nazi persecution in 1938 and 1939.







The station was modernised between 1985-92 but was slightly damaged again in '93 in the Bishopsgate bombing. On 7th July 2005 during the terrorists attacks 7 people were killed when a bomb exploded on an underground train as it left Liverpool Street.

 








 When I came across this falconer holding a Harris's hawk outside the station I thought he was showing the bird to some children nearby, but actually, he was a pest controller.
He patrolled the cafes outside the station and prevented the pigeons from landing there.  You might also spot another hawk in Trafalgar Square that flies around the square daily to control the number of pigeons.

Our World Tuesday Graphic

29 comments:

  1. Mr LOL and I plan to visit all the London mainline train stations some day. On that list :). Super shots.

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  2. I forget which one, but at least one of the stations has employed a hawk handler with his hawk to get rid of pigeons. Great photos and interesting history.

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  3. You need a few sparrow hawk they would soon get rid of them. Never been to liverpool street station

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  4. What a great way to keep the pigeons under control! And that statue brought tears to my eyes, remembering the thousands of children who were saved by the British people.

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  5. Another of London's beautiful stations and I love the pigeon control expert! Also the moving reminder of England's compassion for the Jewish children caught up in the war.

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  6. Beautiful station and interesting facts. I did not know that during WW2, Jewish children were sent here to escape the Nazis. I had to laugh when I saw the Golden Arches in your last photo. Mickey D's are everywhere.

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  7. A beautiful and historic station it is indeed and what great captures!! Thanks, too, for the very moving reminder of the compassion shown to Jewish children -- innocents caught up in a war they had nothing to do with!! May we never forget. Always a great post/photos! I loved seeing the falconer and his friend!! Wonderful!! Have a great week!!

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  8. Beautiful station and photography ~ fascinating post and the falcon and pest controller are great! ~ carol

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  9. What a wealth of history and drama .... and this beautiful station has survived it all.

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  10. the station is so beautiful, it is a destination in itself.

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  11. Clever idea for pigeon control:) Love how you show the ceilings of the station!

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  12. What an historic station. I love the pigeon control.

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  13. Excellent post. I did not realize so many children left without their parents. And the hawk patrol, that is unique to me.

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  14. What a wonderful station. I just took a train from Memphis to New Orleans and saw many stations – but nothing like this one. The station in New Orleans only has 3 trains stopping by!

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  15. What a job that young man has.... Bet that hawk does a good job of keeping away the pigeons though.... ha.....

    I remember reading about the Liverpool Street Station ---and all of the children that were saved there... AWESOME.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  16. What an architectural wonder. Nice shots!

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  17. Indeed, Sounds a great and famous railway station! beautiful photos.

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  18. interesating building. And to hear about the Falcons. Never heard of such a thing before. It is gret!

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  19. Wonderful shots of the station.

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  20. Wow! That's an intriguing history the railway station has got ... and it's great to see a 'natural' solution to the pigeon problem!!

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  21. Great looking building - and such interesting history as to why there are some many "main" stations in London.

    I can't help but wonder how some people would respond to Kindertransport trains these days.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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  22. I have seen such a controller in Hastings, it was not for the pigeons but for the seagulls !
    I have never been in this area. Interesting to know !

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  23. wonderful pixs love the Harris Hawk....lovely!!!thanks for your comments on my blog

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  24. Interesting info about Liverpool St Station. My daughter was on the underground when the bomb went off. Not the same train but one going into the city. A great way to clear the pigeons.

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  25. That's an impressive station, and a great use for those birds. We have native hawks around my house, but I wish there were more!

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  26. What an interesting post about the station. Those falconers I have never seen in a big city, Amsterdam could use some too I think. There are pigeons everywhere.

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  27. I remember the station and the statue and the history. Fascinating bit about the falcons ...seems like a great idea.

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