Welcome to my blog

This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Thursday, 20 September 2012

The Ferryman's seat

Until 1750 the only bridge crossing the Thames was London Bridge so there existed water taxis or 'wherries' to ferry people across the river. The ferrymen would sit and wait on stone benches whilst their ferries filled up with customers from the theatre (The Rose and the Globe) or the nearby brothels. The picture above shows the last remaining example of the ferryman's seat. It is made of flint and is quite tiny. I don't know of any adult who would be able to sqeeze into it these days! 

8 comments:

  1. What a great little thing! I suppose if some of us rowed on the Thames all day, everyday, we might be able to fit into the seat!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Australia

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ha! Very interesting, but yes, it's made for a very little seat, isn't it? :-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Interesting post … I really do believe people were smaller long ago. I’ve seen some armor that would fit only an adolescent child nowadays.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Had to laugh at Stewarts comment ... maybe that's what I should be doing more of ... Rowing on the Thames!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. We are becoming a race of giants.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I think it is great that they have preserved this so well, the Southwark area is really a very pleasant place to explore.

    ReplyDelete

Thank-you for reading my blog. I would love to read your comments.