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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Monday, 9 June 2014

London Museum # 9 Canal Museum









 Backing onto the Regent's Canal is the London Canal Museum. The building was built in 1863 as an ice warehouse for Carlo Gatti who became an ice importer and ice cream maker.




Horse drawn carts would collect the ice via the front entrance .
















The ice was imported in huge blocks from Norway and  brought by the canal boats to the warehouse where it was stored in large wells.









This is one of two wells which stored the ice here. It was about 10 m across and 13m deep. The ice could be stored here for many months.

 This is a model of a working well.
 
During Victorian times ice was kept in an ice cabinet . They were insulated with cork and lined with zinc. Melt water drained out of a hole at the bottom.
An ice cream seller's bicycle.



This is the traditional canal artwork, often based around the themes of roses and castles which you find on many of the canal boats


 
The doors of the canal boats are also painted with similar themes.



These were working boats with the majority of space being taken up by the cargo leaving little  space inside for the 'Bargee' and his family.


 Sharing with Our World Tuesday Our World Tuesday Graphic

29 comments:

  1. That is so interesting. It's amazing the ice would last all the way from Norway and they could keep it frozen.

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  2. Another interesting museum... Thanks for sharing... Talking about the chunks of ice reminded me of when I was a very young child (in the '40's)... There was an ICE house --where you could stop and buy ice for your needs... Back then, ice houses were very necessary --especially for homes without electricity. Haven't seen any ice houses for years!!! Guess --once everyone got electricity---the big ice companies went out-of-business.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  3. How interesting that London's ice came from Norway. The artwork on the dishes and canal boats is so bright and colorful. And it looks like Mrs Bargee had some time to crochet lace for her curtains!

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  4. When I was small, my Dad took me to an ice house. I still remember the guy picking up a huge block of ice with these huge curved metal tongs and throwing it on his shoulder which was covered with a leather bib. Some folks in the early fifties still had ice boxes...and these guys came right into your kitchen to deliver your block of ice.

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  5. I enjoyed the tour of the London Canal Museum.. I like the artwork on the canal boats. Amazing that the ice came from Norway, isn't that far? Thanks for sharing, have a happy week!

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  6. Great photos. You always show such interesting places and I enjoy the history and stories about them. I thought the Victorian Ice Cabinet was especially interesting. Thanks for sharing.

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  7. WHat a great little museum.

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  8. I am getting more interested in learning about UK canals. Would enjoy visiting this museum.

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  9. Interesting museum, very nice to visit.

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  10. I love museums and that is a great one.. Ice cream yea

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  11. One day I'm going to do a journey in a narrow boat - I'm just not sure when!

    cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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  12. Great history lesson today. Yet another place to add to my next visit.

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  13. How interesting, especially how the ice could last so long. Simply beautiful artwork too.

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  14. So much effort for ice (and not that long ago either). Amazing how fast times have changed.

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  15. Fascinating, somewhere I need to visit myself I think. :)

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  16. lovely to see the canal photos - I've not been on a local narrowboat at all - just viewed them from the towpath - I once travelled on the Kennet & Avon and also visited the Falkirk Wheel.

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  17. Beautiful displays at the museum.

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  18. I have a memory (admittedly distant) of the ice arriving at our house (horse and wagon) and being stored in our ice box. The traditional canal artwork was beautiful. What an interesting post!

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  19. Wonderful visual tour with your creative photos for OWT ~ thanks, xoxo

    artmusedog and carol (A Creative Harbor)

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  20. It is first time to know that London's ice came from Norway.Interesting!! How lovely to see the painted boat in the similar way of canal art.I also like the an ice cream seller's bicycle. So sweet!

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  21. Interesting post and shots. I love the reflection in the water.

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  22. That is fascinating. I've read than in America the ice would come from the northern states and be kept through the summer as you're describing here.

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  23. What an unusual collections of things--I love it!

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  24. How interesting ! and today we all all do our ice cubes ourselves !

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  25. That was really interesting - thank you. I had never heard of the canal museum. Difficult to imagine how Italy had already developed such a flair for ice cream when ice had to be imported even to England!

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  26. strange, but I have never been to London. Maybe it is time soon.

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  27. We hired a canal boat for a Thames cruise and we stopped at this Museum ... I think the guy who owned the boat was on the board of it or something. He knew everybody there. It was so interesting (That cruise was a highlight of our stay). We were celebrating our 50th Anniversary Year with our visit and this cruise was a fancy one with delicious meals and champagne etc. We felt like royalty!

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