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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Thursday, 13 March 2014

Barton Aqueduct



This is the Barton Swing Road Bridge which links the city of Salford to the Borough of Trafford in Manchester. The bridge crosses the River Irwell which is part of the Manchester Ship Canal. The canal is an inland waterway, 36 miles long which starts at the Mersey Estuary in Liverpool and follows the routes of the rivers Mersey and Irwell.  It allowed ships to come inland to the port of Manchester. The Barton Road Bridge swings open to allow the large ships to travel to and from Manchester.



About a hundred metres away from the road bridge is the Barton Aqueduct. The original aqueduct was built in 1761 to take the Bridgewater canal over the River Irwell. The canal was needed to take the coal from the collieries in Worsley to Manchester about 10 miles away. It was considered an engineering wonder of the industrial age. With the building of the Manchester Ship Canal a new aqueduct was needed which could swing out of the way to allow the ships to go through.

The Barton Swing Aqueduct was opened in 1893. The aqueduct swings open, full of water, to allow the larger ships to sail freely along the Manchester Ship Canal.













The Barton Road Bridge in the background with the aqueduct in the foreground and in between is the control tower.





It is possible to walk alongside the Bridgewater canal but not along the swing section. Strolling by the canal on Monday morning in the bright sunshine the water was so still it was like looking into a mirror.








Sharing with James at Weekend Reflections

27 comments:

  1. Bridges are so cool! I love your photos and story.

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  2. Hi There, We are home from George's fabulous birthday trip. I will blog about it tomorrow. It was truly a trip we will be talking about for a VERY long time!!!!

    I had never heard of a Swing Bridge UNTIL hubby took me to Myrtle Beach years ago... There is one down there ---and we watched it open so that big boats could get through... Interesting!

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  3. What a wonderful series of pictures. Loved seeing the bridge and all the shadows and reflections. A beautiful part of your country. Historical and still so important.

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  4. That's a lot of water ways. It doesn't flood here?

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  5. Can both the bridge and the aqueduct still swing?

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    1. Yes they both still swing but these days not that many large ships go through. It is a curse when the road bridge has to close so that it can swing open, although if you know in advance there is now another way over the river via the M60 Barton bridge.

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  6. Wonder if the swing the Aqueduct with a Narrowboat on it. That would be fun looking down on a ship going past

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    1. I am sure that would be against all health and safety regulations!

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  7. How interesting, amazing how old it is !

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  8. Wow...you have so many wonderful shots, and such an amazing place...

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  9. some really great reflections! crystal clear!

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  10. Great reflections! And kudoos to the folks who engineered and built this years ago!

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  11. Reflection on the bridge, reflection under the bridge... We have the total package, with week ! Cool shots...

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  12. So many reflections to choose from - love the one on the bridge.

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  13. The canal is a great place to find reflections

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  14. So many good reflections, and some with a very unique view of the bridge and reflection - great captures! Also, didn't realize that a canal could run for so many miles!

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  15. Wonderful series of complex reflections!

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  16. Lots of great reflections and such a lovely blue sky!

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  17. wow, you captured a lot of gorgeous reflections. :)

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  18. Marie, «Louis» hopes that you will link this with his Sunday Bridges meme which will publish at 22h00m central Europe time Saturday night. :-)

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  19. I like the reflections, but the details of the bridge and the story are excellent!

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  20. «Louis» thanks you for being first to link with his St. Paddy's Day edition of Sunday Bridges. :-)

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  21. Great shots. Amazing that the aqueduct swings open still full of water.

    Visiting from Sunday Bridges.

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  22. Super info and shots. Weather looks brilliant.

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  23. Interesting post and fabulous reflections!

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  24. What an interesting life that bridge leads! You've captured great shots of it. Thanks for visiting my blog! Enjoy the beginnings of spring.

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