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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Monday, 24 November 2014

Royal College of Organists





Walking past the Royal Albert Hall  your eyes are usually fixed on the architecture and its many exits reflecting the surroundings. However if you take your eyes away from the iconic building, you may notice this building on the other side of the road.
 This is the Royal College of Organists.
It was part of a number of educational and artistic buildings which arose in this area following the Great Exhibition of 1851. The area which is referred to as 'Albertoplis' stretches from the Natural History Museum to the Albert Hall. Albert, of course, was the husband of Queen Victoria and the instigator of The Great Exhibition.


Once the Albert Hall was completed this building was built to as a National Training school for Music.

When the Royal College of Music opened on Marylebone Road  it was no longer needed by that organisation and became the College of Organists in 1904 until it closed in 1990.







It is currently privately owned but, as with many of our large heritage buildings, not by a British resident. There is some debate about whether it was bought as a home, an investment or just to have the bragging rights!
                                 




This is the current Royal College of Music, Marylebone Road.


Sharing with Our World Tuesday

28 comments:

  1. Both buildings are very handsome. Isn't the British population crying out for restrictions on foreign ownership? I guess not, as it isn't here either. People mutter, but there is no organisation. But when Ukip says they will protect historic buildings from foreign ownership, watch and wait and see what happens. I don't see harm in buildings being left in limbo for an extended period as long as basic maintenance is kept up.

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  2. I love that intricate panelling! I actually prefer the organist's building (who knew there were enough to attract their own building!) to the others, although that's just a personal preference, of course! It's been WAY too long since I visited your blog - but I hope to be 'seeing' you more often!

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  3. The building is so nice decorated, it is a shame all those heritage buildings are sold to investment companies. That is a bad development....

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  4. Handsome building for sure and with so much history. I wonder what will become of it.

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  5. It is also used as the front of the private dwelling of 'Mr Selfridge' in that brilliant series. Gorgeous building x

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  6. I hope this one will be around for a long time, since it is really beautiful. Thanks for sharing it. :-)

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  7. enjoyed the photos :) (and history...as always)

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  8. Beautiful building and interesting history.

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  9. Both architecturally interesting buildings.

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  10. I was lucky enough to happen upon that building when I was in London in September and was fascinated with its details. Nice to know more of the background and its connection with Albert Hall.

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  11. Buildings are really impressive and fascinating..

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  12. Great shots of unique buildings!

    Happy Thanksgiving in the USA
    artmusedog and carol
    www.acreativeharbor.com

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  13. Beautiful buildings, the details are very pretty! Great post. Have a happy week!

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  14. Great photos of the buildings and so interesting to see photos of such historic places. They are especially interesting to me as my earliest music certificates are from the Royal Schools of Music!

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  15. Very beautiful and I love seeing the details.

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  16. This building is an architectural marvel with so much work on them.

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  17. It is a handsome building. I'm glad that whoever owns keeps it up.

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  18. Sometimes it is really worthwhile to look up and see the details !
    Brussels has installed its Christmas tree on the Grand'Place !

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  20. I remember hearing how so many fine homes and buildings have been bought by non British citizens. I hope in this case it is for bragging rights, because it shouldn't be a private home I don't think. Beautiful detail.

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  21. Remarkable looking detail - I wonder if anybody can still produce such work?

    The orchid in my shot is about 2 inches in each direction.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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  22. In think sometimes we are in such a rush we miss these beautiful details. janey

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  23. Exquisite detail.

    Hope your journey was ok up the M6. You made me smile.

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  24. You have so much knowledge about the London area together with so many fine photographs that I'm thinking you could forget retiring and perhaps become a tour guide.

    As you say, everyone will look to the Albert Hall and lesser buildings go unnoticed.

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  25. Music has been a huge part of my life, so it was fascinating to see both the Royal College of Organists and the Royal College of Music. I love the architectural details you have chosen to highlight, as I tend to do in all of your posts.

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  26. Thanks for the tour. Really find the detail interesting.

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Thank-you for reading my blog. I would love to read your comments.