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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Monday, 28 November 2016

Roman London



London's life began with the invasion of the Romans in 43AD. Invading from Kent the Romans' advance was stopped by the River Thames. A bridge was built and with it a network of roads. North of the river the Roman settlement was known as Londinium and quickly established itself as a trading centre for goods brought up the Thames by boat and unloaded at wooden docks by the bridge.




About 200AD the Romans built a defensive wall  around the city.





This wall defined the shape and size of London for over a 1000 years. The area within the wall is now 'the City', the financial sector of London.
















Parts of the wall can still be seen

These remains are next to the Tower of London

This is one of the most impressive surviving sections of the wall  and can be seen to the Southeast of Tower Hill Underground station.













Other parts of the wall can be seen on Noble Street near the Museum of London.

 
The Great Fire of London in 1666 was stopped by the wall preventing further destruction north of the wall. Later on parts of the wall were demolished or incorporated into new buildings but bomb damage in the 1940s revealed more of the City Wall which is now protected by English Heritage.





Roman discoveries are still being made as archaeologists must excavate an area before any new construction within the City of London can begin. In 1988 Museum of London archaeologists discovered the site of an amphitheatre beneath the Guildhall Yard. It was built in 70AD as a wooden structure  but was restructured in the 2nd century to accommodate 6000 spectators. After the Romans left Britain in the 4th Century the amphitheatre was dismantled and the stone used for building materials elsewhere,


The remains can be seen below the Guildhall Art Gallery.



 Clever light projections help you to imagine what it would have looked like.

Sharing with Our World Tuesday

20 comments:

  1. Fascinating fabric of Great Britain!

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  2. Although time chipped away at the stone, this once powerful wall still stands tall from the view of history!

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  3. That's awesome - what a history London has. My city isn't much more than 100 years old!

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  4. Seeing walls almost 2000 years old is almost beyond my comprehension. I note there seems to be quite a bit of vegetation on the wall remains, which could do a lot of damage.

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  5. Incredibly interesting and fascinating in its antiquity. Thank you for this. :-)

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  6. Wonderful piece of history. Good to know.

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  7. How amazing this much has survived for so long

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  8. Great shots and a fascinating history.

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  9. So special those remains are still there. Imagine how old they are. I don't think our current buildings will last for ever like the romans did.

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  10. It is amazing that sections still exist. I often think what structures put up today will still be here in thousands of years time

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  11. Two millennia of history...just jaw dropping.

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  12. We saw some of that wall when we were in London. The London Museum was well worth our visit too.

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  13. It is so fascinating to see something from that long ago. My imagination goes nuts!

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  14. Ah ~ history ~ fascinating post and photos ~ thanks!

    Wishing you a happy week ~ ^_^

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  15. Very interesting post and great photos. The Romans certainly knew how to make buildings and walls that lasted. Wonderful building techniques. Thanks for sharing.

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  16. I never knew that so many sections of the wall remain. very interesting.

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  17. Nicely done. It's wonderful that we have so much left - and remarkable too, when you think about it! I need to see that amphitheatre!

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  18. It's impressive how much roman buildings can last so long. Those we were not dismantled of course.
    Have a nice weekend!

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  19. Hello, Dear friend; It was really educative to read this post to know the history♪ The title ”Roman London”really expressed this post. I enlarged pictures, thank you very much for sharing.
    Sending Lots of Love and Hugs from Japan to my Dear friend, xoxo Miyako*

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