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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Monday, 19 May 2014

Churchill War rooms (London Museum#11)





At the back of Whitehall is the entrance to the most important underground building during the 2WW, the Cabinet War Rooms. This was the secret headquarters of the British government during the war.






When the Japanese surrendered on 16th August 1945, these rooms were locked and not used again. They remained secret until the late seventies when the Imperial War Museum had the task of preserving their contents and ensuring the site was preserved as an historic site. Part of the site was opened to the public in 1984 but it wasn't until 2003 that the public were able to see the rest of the site.

















Behind this door is the small room where Churchill was able to make his most important calls in private.









This is the room used by Winston Churchill's detectives.

Another room used by one of the chiefs of staff. Note the chamber pot under the bed.










A little more colourful, this is the room  where Mrs Churchill stayed when she visited her husband.





Chief of staff conference room. This is where the heads of the army, navy and air force would meet to discuss their strategic plans.


Field telephone.









Even the phones were colour coded.



This board has been left as it was on the day the headquarters were closed.


Winston Churchill's room.


Sharing with Our World Tuesday. Our World Tuesday Graphic

25 comments:

  1. Absolutely fascinating! I was mesmerized by the thought of what occurred in those rooms. Thank you for the peek into the past. :-)

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  2. Incredible history and a terrific post for the day!! I, too, was mesmerized by the history! Thank you for sharing!!

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  3. This place is one of the most chilling and meaningful places to visit in London. I'll never forget my visit.

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  4. Interesting to see a bit of history preserved like this!

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  5. Very interesting and great to have a reminder of how hard it was to keep the government running during those war years.

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  6. Wow ' it's very interesting. Thanks for sharing.

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  7. Fascinating historical post and great shot to share for OWT ~ glad to see ~ them ~ xoxo

    artmusedog and carol (A Creative Harbor)

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  8. Great shots! So much history. Amazing.

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  9. Thank you another place on my list to visit

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  10. wonderful post. as I get older, I find myself becoming more interested in history!

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  11. what a fascinating place to visit. I wonder why it was locked for so long. I must put this on my list for when I am in London again....whenever that will be!
    Have a great week. I am joining you at Our World Tuesday.

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  12. oh how interesting and informative.

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  13. What an amazing place. I've read about it and would love to see it - you got some great photos of it, which isn't easy underground.

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  14. Great post! Color coded phones!?

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  15. So much history - I like it!

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  16. I see Winston Churchill had a much needed wider bed. All this underground living must have been a terrible strain on all concerned, for one thing, the deprivation of light alone would make one despondent. Wartime calls for a lot of sacrifices, even for those in the highest positions.

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  17. Wonderful insight into hidden secrets.

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  18. So interesting. Thank God their planning worked.

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  19. Such a wonderful walk down history!! Thank you!

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  20. Interesting tour!! Boom, Bobbi and Gary.

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  21. This is very interesting to visit, i like those histirical places and this one is eell preserved.

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  22. Fascinating! As long as they had their tea, I guess they could sleep almost anywhere.

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  23. How interesting ! The best man of Mr. G. had been his butler when Churchill was retired. He told us so many funny stories about him and his wife who always controlled that there was not too much whisky in the glass, lol !

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  24. If there's one Englishman I have respect for it's Churchill! Am glad the secrets aren't secrets anymore! Your comment about your mother recently having taken up painting made me smile! So many people "always wanted to" but never got to, because they thought they couldn't do it while having a steady job.

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  25. and today is D-Day.... great post

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