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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Monday, 18 July 2016

The Hive at Kew










The Hive is an installation and experience created by Wolfgang Buttress.It was commissioned by the UK Government to form the centrepiece of the UK pavilion at the 2015 Milan Expo. Wolfgang was inspired by the work of Dr Martin Bencsik on bee vibration and communication patterns




The structure highlights the importance of bees as pollinators.



Illuminated by 1000 LED lights, the Hive represents a vast honey bee hive. It's linked to one of Kew's hives and the lights flicker in time to vibrations caused when the bees communicate with one another.













The Hive is surrounded by a wild meadow.





At Kew Gardens the scientists and horticulturists are exploring the worrying decline of bee populations and investigating the relationship between plants and their pollinators. 





21 comments:

  1. In your first photo it does look like it's vibrating - the way there are lots of jagged edges. Looks like a very interesting installation, and one that educates as well as looks fascinating.

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  2. Much needed work and a stunning work of art

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  3. Quite a sculpture. Is it a permanent installation there?

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  4. Wow, must be fascinating to watch the lights go on and off.

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  5. What a great artwork - it must be amazing at night.

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  6. What a fascinating/extraordinary piece of work! Thank you for sharing.

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  7. I'm reading Bill Bryson's latest book about Britain and cannot help but think of you several times a day. Love that hive! :-)

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  8. Very interesting structure.

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  9. That is indeed a very big work, literally and functionally, and really awesome. I can't imagine how long to finish it.

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  10. I think that was an great work..and very interesting one to.

    http://blog.photobymanka.se/

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  11. I have never been there and my wife keeps on about taking for a visit

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  12. That's a really cool piece of art! And it's good to highlight the decline of the bees.

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  13. Very interesting..... There has been a lot of talk her about the decline of Honey Bees... That would be horrible if we lost them... Hubby and I love HONEY.

    I enjoyed reading about how the bees communicate with each other. NEAT.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  14. The first photo to looks like a swarm of bees swarming, as if there is movement. Cool!
    Awareness of the plight of the world's bees and the danger to the world's food production needs all the attention that can be brought to it.

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  15. I definitely brake for hive installations.

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  16. That looks very strange !

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  17. It sure is an intricate piece. Bad news about the bee population decreasing that will cause heaps of problems in agriculture.

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  18. This intricate work of art is beautiful in its own right and for the symbolism, but then when you explained how it is actually connected to a real hive it became even more amazing. I hope the Kew Garden team (and others studying the problem) are successful -- our life depends on them!

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