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This is it! I've given up work -retired from the rat race and am about to start on a 10 year adventure, doing all those things I've been meaning to do but never had the time to do them. I've offloaded my responsibilities and it is now my time. So follow my adventures and see whether I actually manage anything!



Monday, 24 August 2015

Sculpture in the City

Sculpture in the City is a series of installations in public spaces. They are a part of an outreach education programme sponsored by city businesses. In a number of workshops school students have creatively engaged with the sculptures, not only giving the students an opportunity to discover new places in the City of London but also to learn about the value of public art. There are 14 sculptures scattered around the City and I have chosen a selection for you to see. I have included an explanation of the sculpture taken in essence from information boards sited near the sculptures. 






Broken Pillar by Shan Hur.




In his sculptures, Hur likes to incorporate found objects, usually relevant to its location. The location here is St Helen's Churchyard. There has been a church on this site since the 13thC and its neighbours nowadays are the Gherkin and other high rise office blocks. The artist encourages the viewer to question the world around them and the objects hidden within.












Charity by Damien Hirst.






This is a 22 foot bronze sculpture based on The Spastic Society's  (now called Scope) charity collection box which was commonly found outside local chemists and shops in the 1960s and 1970s.  Hirst's version has been vandalised and a number of coins lie on the ground next to the crow bar.











Carson, Emma, Takashi, Zezi, Nia by Tomoaki Suzuki







Japanese artist Tomoaki has moved away from traditional Japanese tradition of woodcarving and has executed these figures in painted bronze which is a first for him. Using his experience of living in London he has created these detailed figures of urban youth at one third their actual size( personally I think this is incorrect as they looked more like one tenth of actual size). Because of their size the artist felt he could focus his attention on the figures in a way that would not be possible on a larger scale.

                         


                        






Organisms of control by Keita Miyazaki




After witnessing the 2011 tragedy Miyazaki wanted to create artworks out of rubble with sculptures pointing to a new beginning. The artist marries traditional Japanese techniques with parts of old car engines to create a new visual universe. This sculpture also includes sound which took a little while for me to realise.  (I assumed it was from a nearby coffee shop). The jingles you hear are original compositions inspired by music played in Japanese supermarkets; sounds of Tokyo and London; tunes played in the Tokyo public transport system. Miyazaki wanted to create a geographical connection between London and Japan.




Altar by Kris Martin




This is a metal replica of the multi panelled, 15th C Ghent Altarpiece by Herbert and Jan Van Eyck. Also known as the Adoration of the Mystic Lamb it is located in the Cathedral of St Bavo in Ghent. The artist has only reproduced the frame leaving out the twelve folding panels. Rather than marvelling at the painted religious scene in which flora,fauna and figures are painted with astonishing accuracy and brilliant colours, we are invited to look through an open structure at the real world beyond.




'O my friends, there are no friends' by Sigalit Landau




Laudau states the work is 'a commemoration of the future, when we will be able to slip into these shoes and be part of a community that will create a better history, with more solidarity, more generosity and regeneration'. Real laces, soft and vulnerable link together pairs of bronze shoes.






Rays (London) by Xavier Veilhan
This piece is part of Veilhan's series 'Rays' Other pieces in this series have been installed in Marseille (France), Los Angeles (USA), Murcia (Spain) and Tokyo (Japan). The artwork, frames and questions the views of the City opened up by recent construction activity.




31 comments:

  1. Interesting art though some I would say is pushing it a bit

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  2. Can't say I like all of them, some artists are too fancy and I think they just make fun of us ! I love the figurines they are really very nice.

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  3. All are meaningful works of art … each compelling in their own way. The symbolism of the shoes perhaps strikes the loudest cord in a world of both beauty and strife.

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  4. Most modern art leaves me cold but these pieces speak to me, especially the first one.

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  5. You know there's good sculpture and not so good sculpture. Looks like you captured some of both.

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  6. Thanks for including the explanations. They really add to understanding of the artwork. My favorite is the shoe one, possibly because of the theme.
    Last September I searched out the sculptures when I was in London and saw quite a few.

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  7. Such fascinating art pieces. I hope some day to see these in person but until I get to London, I've got you to show its beauty to me. :-)

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  8. Public art is always very interesting. It's nice to hear the story behind the artwork.

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  9. What a neat collection of sculptures. I like the broken pillar, it is like finding a hidden treasure! Enjoy your new week!

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  10. Very interesting and thought-provoking art installations. I think you would need a lot of time to really understand what the artist was wanting you to see and experience. Thanks for sharing.

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  11. It's the shoes that really grab my attention. The whole idea is equals a wonderful collection - all with a special message. Terrific.

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  12. Great photos of very creative sculptures! Wow!

    Happy Week to you,
    artmusedog and carol

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  13. Outdoor exhibits of sculptures make any city more interesting.

    Worth a Thousand Words

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  14. I'm less tactful...some weird stuff out there ;O|

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  15. Very beautiful and purposeful sculptures!
    Lovely photos of the sculptures and your lovely city...
    Have a Beautiful Week!
    Peace :)

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  16. Very interesting. I go searching for them in new cities.
    Great captures.

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  17. Great and interesting photos!

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  18. Interesting sculptures but I'm glad you had the explanations. I like the first one best.

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  19. It must be sculpture week! I can remember the originals of the girl with the box and the leg splint. I think that the sculpture is a very clever work.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Jakarta (for this week!)

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  20. The first three pieces are my favourites. The others are becoming a bit too abstract for my liking.

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  21. The little people are great. They almost look up close like photographs. I like the message the shoes send. janey

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  23. Sorry for the comment boo boo :(
    I wanted to say: I really enjoyed this post. What an interesting exhibition of sculptures. Thank you for taking us along in the exhibit. I also want to thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment, I value your time. 320 Steps | Rome

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  24. I wish I could walk around London and find every one of these. (Actually thistle sentence would be just as correct if it ended before the word 'and') . Some of these installations spoke to me, some were incomprehensible, and one I did not like much at all. That is the way art is supposed to be

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  25. They are all great but my favorites are the pillar, charity, "friends-no friends?" It's such s wonderful chance to be able to walk around and appreciate great artworks.

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  26. Public art is always interesting to see, though I often find most pieces a bit incomprehensible. Once there are explanations like the ones you've provided, it all makes sense and the appreciation level just keeps on rising.

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  27. Wonderful art beautifully presented.

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  28. Hi! Thanks for introducing Japanese artists. I enjoyed your post very much.

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Thank-you for reading my blog. I would love to read your comments.